Jan 02
Ed Eaton Sniper

Young Ed Eaton

While many view snipers as the hidden (safe) threats in war based on their forays in First Person Shooter video games and movies like Saving Private Ryan and Enemy at The Gates, the fact of the matter is that snipers like any other soldiers in war are very susceptible to danger – especially in the case of Sergeant Ed Eaton’s brave protection and rescue of comrade in arms Major Mike Perkins when he had fallen injured in a night assault during the Vietnam war 1969.

Mike and Ed were part of a helicopter night mission when the Viet Cong shot down the chopper resulting in most of the men injured with near fatal wounds. Mike got the worst of it being pinned down under the helicopter and unable to get out. Now remember that at this time the men were still under attack and Ed Eaton in his own words said that he had the least amount of injuries and felt it necessary to protect his fellow soldiers.

One Man versus Two Armies

Climbing atop the wreckage and using a combination of his busted sniper rifle and an M16, Ed used the Sniper’s night sights to spot two separate groups of Viet Cong descending upon them at up to 500 meters. Ed traded shots with the groups without hesitation to consider how open he was to their return fire but it was enough to slow their descent upon his location. The use of the two guns made the enemy believe that Ed was more than one man and after he got a gist of the flaw in his sniper rifle, he adjusted to its aim and began taking guys out one at a time.

When a pair of helicopters came through to rescue the men, Mike whose injuries were too much for the ride opted to stay and was given a grenade for suicide in case of capture. The choppers were about to leave when Ed asks to remain with his comrade because he did not want him dying alone out there with no hope for survival. The pair were left there on the battlefield with Ed holding off even more soldiers with limited ammunition as they descended upon him from their positions.

Thinking himself left for dead, Ed told Mike that the last two bullets were for himself and the injured friend but was rescued before it came down to that decision.  Ed Eaton described his rescue on the commentary for the book Inside the Crosshairs: Snipers in Vietnam, by Michael Lee Lanning, on the website HistoryNet.com:

“In reference to the Hist channel story and as to how Maj. perkins and myself got out. Our Bn. Commander came in later. We thought for sure we were left alone but thank God; only thought it. I caught a ride on a Cobra that took me to a rice pattie where I was later picked up by a Dustoff.

As to Awards for this action. Mike while in a hosp. in Japan requested action to be taken on this matter. Our Bn. was in the process of leaving VN and I’m sure that in that hectic situation the paperwork was lost.”Original Comment here

I’m just an idealistic civilian but in terms of what I know about a Congressional Medal of Honor and the fact that Ed not only protected multiple men with no thought of his own life as he stood ground against invaders using multiple bullets from his broken guns, I am pretty damn sure that he is long overdue for his. Still this is not my call and I have the utmost respect and awe for a man that could black out and accomplish such a feat in saving multiple lives in the worst of circumstances and the fact that he and Mike Perkins are still alive to recant the tale.

If you want badass, how about a guy that can hold toe with an army using a broken sniper rifle and the cover of night? Not badass enough? How about the fact that he elected to stay behind to protect the last man injured from the invading horde? Ya that’s more than many of you could ever argue for the term badass and Ed Eaton is definitely it.


Want to contact Ed and thank him personally for his service? Visit his website at EdTheSniper.com and show him some love. Thanks for reading.


I learned about Ed from The History Channel’s Sniper: Deadliest Missions, it was a great show that presented some really epic shots made by snipers from every walk of life.

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  • Ed Carricarte

    Sgt Ed Eaton, thank you for your service and you should have gotten the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank the History Channel for such a fantastic story. Ed, I wish only good think come your and long life. My brother Louis KIA, December of 63, Army and I was a paper pusher in the Air Force.

    God Bless You and hope this government gives you proper recognition.

    • Kevin White

      Why wasn’t this man given the medal of honor? This story was beyond inspirational. The bravery and unselfishness of this hero is unlike any I’ve ever heard. Seriously, some sort of petition should be initiated to give this man what he deserves. Who’s with me?

      • John Wilch (‘Nam Vet – ’68-69)

        Just saw the story on Ed and I was surprised that he did not receive the MOH for his heroic actions. Go figure, the powers (US Government) to be have conveniently have forgotten this Brother’s action. If I was in combat I’d would want Ed with me.
        WHERE CAN I JOIN THE MOVEMENT TO GET ED’S HIS WELL DESERVED MEDAL?

  • Win

    MOH, or not, Ed gets my respect and gratitude. Great story. Wow!

    • Chester Bickerstaff

      I don’t think, I know that Ed deserves the medas of Honor. If he doesn’t get one, they should do away with it and never give one out again. His is long over due. I was a combat medic in the Vietnam war in 1970 and 1971. I never left a man behind myself. I had rather died there with my men than left one, because I have to sleep at night. The medal of Honor handed out today to Sgt. Dekod Meyer was probably deserved, but the one Ed hasn’t gotten yet is much more earned, deserved and due him. Get your head out mr. President and give this man his medal of Honor

  • Luis Sergio Lucas

    I am Brazilian and I saw the story of Mr. Ed in the History Chanel. I and
    My family were amazed with such courage and honor. It is the human
    in the highest degree of purity in a moment of utter chaos. Congratulations
    Sir Ed and his comrades in arms.

  • Pingback: Wednesday Hero: Sgt. Ed Eaton « My Weekly Thoughts

  • Leighton

    Courage of a Soldier such as Sgt Ed Eaton is an inspiration. Most of us can only dream of having the same loyalty in times of danger and certain death.

    • http://halloftheblackdragon.com Greg Dragon

      Thanks for your comment Leighton, Sgt. Ed’s story was most moving to me because of the proven selflessness he displayed in his actions on that awful night and in the interviews that have followed. I checked out your blog and think that it is a great idea and an inspiration for anyone who comes along with similar aspirations. You’re due for greatness yourself, take care and visit us often.

      • Leighton

        I appreciate your words. And I will visit often.

        Thanks!

  • MJD

    Just saw this story on History. Sgt. Eaton you are a hero. If you have ever seen Pulp Fiction you deserve to carry that wallet labeled “Bad MF”!!!!!!!!!!!! Go get yourself some tilamook ice cream you deserve it!!! God bless.

  • Scott

    Ed, you are the Audie Murphy of Vietnam. What you did was nothing short of heroic, amazing, and commitment to a Brother Soldier that in undeniable. If anyone deserves to be recognized with the Medal of Honor, it is you Sir. I had the Blessing of meeting a living MOH recipient in 2003. So what can be done to push this forward?

    It makes me so ill of how you and all that Served in the Vietnam War as half crazed, wacked out on drugs by the media and Hollywood. Little has been done to document the extra hazards, tenacity, and over-all devotion that it takes to make a Military Sniper. Hats off to the History Channel for making such a fine series bringing to light the accomplishments and sacrifices of our Military Snipers.

  • http://MSN.com Joe Miller

    Sgt. Ed Eaton demonstated all the qualities that S/Sgt Sal Guinta showed us In Iraq. He not only saved another wounded Soldier, but did so in the face of certain death for both of them. The Viet Cong were about to over-run his position but he held them off using a broken weapon and mal-functioning sniper rifle. He is deserving of the Nation’s Highest Award even if it is to be presented way too late for his “Uncommon Valor above and beyond the call to duty.”

  • John Eperjesi

    I’d like to shake your hand.

  • Randy holubek

    What wasn’t covered in the show was the SGT Eaton had suffer a broken back in the crash
    As a PFC stationed at Ft.Stewart I hope that in the face of danger I could have half as much courage as you SGT. Thank you for your service and hope you receive what you deserve and in my opinion long over due for.

    • http://halloftheblackdragon.com Greg Dragon

      Wow thank you for sharing that extra tidbit Randy… it just keeps getting more and more amazing what Sgt. Ed Eaton endured.

  • Mark S. Hardy, Capt. USMC (ret)

    To Sergeant Ed Eaton – I was absolutely inspired by your heroism, selfless courage and extraordinary valor. To hear that you felt compelled to protect your fellow soldiers because you suffered “the least amount of injuries” holding off the advancing Viet Cong, and then returning to the side of Maj. Mike Perkins because “you didn’t want him to die alone without hope for survival” is the epitome of unselfish valor and courage. You are an inspiration. As a brother-in-arms, I salute you and hope our great country gives you the highest recognition you so truly deserve.

    • John Wilch (‘Nam Vet – ’68-69)

      Semper Fi, Cap.
      I agree with your post. As you can see I too served in ‘Nam with the 1st Cav as a Helicopter Door Gunner. I finally decided to hang up my spurs in 1992 because I was at the point that the injuries I had received during my career would not let me deploy with my unit. So, Cap, how do we go about getting Sergeant Eaton his award (MOH) for his action on that night in ‘Nam.

      SGT. EATON, WELCOME HOME!

  • Dan

    I just saw this BRAVE mans story on the History Channel. It is a damn shame he has not been given the Medal of Honor. He deserves it!! My oldest son just joined the Marines on the delayed entry program and will leave next June after he graduates. I showed him this story, and seeing the respect he had in his eyes for Ed is beyond words.

    Anyone reading this should email President Obama and ask…no not ask…DEMAND that this man be given an award he should won…correction…that he EARNED.

  • former 10th Mtn. Inf. Solder – Eric T.

    I just viewed the ‘Sniper: Deadliest Missions’ episode on History. I never knew of this story of Sgt. Eaton and am very inspired of his actions. If anyone ever deserved the CMH, it is Sgt. Eaton. As a fellow solder, I would have been honored to serve with you.

  • Anthony Foster

    Sgt. Eaton, thank you for your service to our country. Very few people realize that it is heroes like you that make our country so great. I think everyone that serves as a President, Senator or Congressman should have to serve in our military. Then they would have the respect for our country they should. We would be in a much better place. Thank you again for you bravery and dedication! We all owe you greatly!

  • RJR

    Just saw Sgt. Ed Eaton’s heroic story on the History Channel. If anyone ever deserved the Medal of Honor , it is this man. Sgt. Eaton, your actions epitomize what the MOH stands for. I would contact your local Congressman and US Senator and see if they can expedite the Army paperwork to get you the MOH. Best of luck to you, Sir.

  • Larry Starnes

    Like most I saw your remarkable story on the history channel. I have read every MOH citation and have watched many of the interviews with the GREAT MEN that have received the Metal of Honor. My CO – Captain Charles Q. Williams – stationed in Germany at the time of my service, Army 67-69, was the 2nd GREAT SOLDIER to received the MOH during Viet Nam. I have met and visited with Colonel Don “Doc” Ballard from Kansas City-MOH/Viet Nam. There is something very special about a man that makes the decision that other lives are more important than their own. Ed Eaton being one of those men, should receive THE METAL OF HONOR.

  • bob laurent

    Now that’s the kind of action the CMO was made for!

  • Paul MacGillis

    Sgt Eaton is a man’s man, a soldier’s soldier.MOH is long overdue. Fellow veteran’s and readers; write the American Legion, V.F.W and members of Congress., and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Let’s make it happen before another veteran ‘fades away’.

  • Mauro U. Tongco II. Sgt, Phil Air Force

    (I’ve recently watched the said episode of the history channel program and I was surprised to find that Sgt Eaton had no commendations attached to his name. Other snipers featured on the show had their commendations follow their names e.g. Silver Star but I was shocked to find Sgt Eaton had none. There are dozens of gallant Army infantry men who have rightly earned the MOH; from jumping on grenades to holding-off waves of op-for assaulting their position. Sgt Eaton risked his life to hold back the VC advance until evac arrived. When it did, he lived up to the credo “Leave no man behind” by going back for his CO, Capt Perkins. His valor and courage is an inspiration undoubtedly worthy of the likes of SSgt Franklin D. Miller of Vietnam and Delta Snipers Shughart and Gordon of Mogadishu. I salute your Sgt Eaton! You are an inspiration to me and my cadets.

  • Tim Schlosser

    I have seen the History Channel show several times and I always stop what I am doing and watch this. Though he undoubtedly should be awarded the Medal of Honor, I think Eaton has won much more than that…..the respect of an entire nation and the life-long gratitude of a comrade. Unbelievable.

  • Wayne

    Another fact about this guy that was not mentioned in many of the stories was that he did all this with 2 cracked veterbra from the crash. He basically had a BROKEN BACK while holding off the enemy. I mean really, how does this guy not have the MOH is beyond me.

  • http://EdEaton ted searfoss

    Iv’e watched and seen alot of war docramentorys in my life , but i just watched the most heroic act any 1one person could do in a life time ! This man should recieve every honor there is known to man ! i’m am a 48 year old man and i could only hope to be half the man ed is .JUST UNBEILIEVABLE !

  • mike j

    i think he should have the
    CMH somethins wrong there

    • John Wilch (‘Nam Vet – ’68-69)

      You’re quite right, Mike. We need to mount a campaign to get this Brother his MOH, so write your Elected Leaders (Congressmen and Senators). Oh, also try and get your family members, friends and neighbors to write theirs. I believe if they get enough letters, E-mail, and faxes they just might get off their fat a–es and do something right.

  • http://www.youtube.com/user/BereanBeacon?feature=mhee Dave Flang

    I would like to have Ed Eaton or Mike read a story from Sam Gipp’s book, Fight On!, which I can record the audio, add images and upload to YouTube.
    Previous uploads:

    The First One: Read by Dan Marvin Lt. Colonel USASF (Ret.)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZFmmd69Vt0

    Refusing to be Cowered: Read by Karl Priest (Retired teacher)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7LO8RhPaOE

    He Refused to Get Bitter: Read by Sam Gipp
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Kf089t98M

    Fight On!, The Dry Run: Read by John Bailey (sound effects)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NIt3ul9OEo

  • http://nehalembaywinery.com RAY SHACKELFORD

    1833-29-11-2011
    ED STOPPED BY MY WINERY , THE NEHALEM BAY WINERY IN NEHALEM OREGON, THIS AFTERNOON. WE TALKED FOR A WHILE. WE HAVE KNOWN EACH OTHER FOR SEVERAL YEARS.WE VISIT ABOUT EVERY 6 MONTHS . I KNEW THAT THERE WAS A SHOW THAT ED WAS GOING TO BE FEATURED ON. BUT DID NOT KNOW IT HAD BEEN SHOWN. AS ALWAYS WE HAD A VERY GOOD TALK WHICH IS SO EASY WITH ANY TWO WAR FIGHTERS THAT RESPECT EACH OTHER. I ASKED HOW TO SEE THE SHOW. ED TOLD ME. WHEN HE LEFT I WATCHED THE SHOW. I WAS AMAZED. I HAVE ALWAYS HAD THE FEELING THAT ED HAD DOWNPLAYED HIS ACTIONS WHEN TALKING ABOUT OUR WAR.
    I AM REASONABLY HIGHLY DECORATED AND HAVE A FEW PURPLE HEARTS, AND SPENT ABOUT 5 AND A HALF YEARS OR SO IN RVN, MOSTLY WITH THE 1ST CAV, OR IN HOSPITALS IN JAPAN AND THE US.
    I THINK THAT ……. ED EATONS ACTIONS AND UNSWERVING DEVOTION TO HIS FELLOW MAN MAKES HIM AS DESERVING OF THE CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR AS ANYONE I HAVE EVER HEARD OF……
    IF ANYONE HAS STARTED A DRIVE OF ANY TYPE. LET ME KNOW i wiould like to be involved. IF NOT I WILL.
    RAY SHACKELFORD
    rayshack1@yahoo.com 1-503-368-9463
    NEHALEM BAY WINERY.com

  • Dennis Gleason

    I was thought to have been brave and they gave me medals for showing courage.

    It wasn’t that I was so brave or displayed that much courage for not leaving the battlefield.

    It was because I was so terribly frightened to let one of my comrades die alone, that my legs would not carry

    me off the field of battle. So, I stayed beside him and fought until I was the last man standing.

    Anonymous Civil War Soldier

    On April 3rd, 1969, the furthest thing from my mind was going off to war in Vietnam. I had received
    scholarships for Football and Baseball at the local Community College in Walla Walla, and as baseball
    season was beginning, I was looking forward to starting as a second baseman for the Warriors. Jim Buchan,
    a new sports writer at the Union Bulletin, had even mentiontioned to me, under his breath, that he thought I had
    a great throwing arm. To me, like most young men in my situation, I had many unrealistic dreams of glory
    and was fairly sure that a professional scout would soon be knocking on my door offering me a Major League
    contract and a boat full of money. Forty-two years later, I’m still waiting for that knock.

    On the same day, eight thousand miles away, a good friend of mine from high school was aboad a Huey helicopter
    heading into danger. On April 3rd, 1969, Sergeant Ed Eaton was a 20-year-old Army sniper. As part of a night raid
    into the Mekong Delta, he and his buddies were searching for the elusive enemy during the Vietnam War.
    Unable to find any Viet Cong, Eddie and his fellow troopers headed back to their landing zone and
    began reloading into the waiting helicopters.

    It wouldn’t be long before the night sky would explode into fire and bullets would rain in on the two
    helicopters as they were attempting to lift off. Luckily, they made it away safely, but once in the air they
    realized that someone was missing.

    Inexplicably, in his excitement, one of the soldiers had jumped off the helicopter when the shooting had begun.
    The Commanding Officer, Capt. Mike Perkins, wasn’t about to leave anyone behind and abruptly ordered the pilot
    to return for him. While Sgt. Eaton’s chopper provided covering fire, the other helicopter was able to locate
    and rescue the stranded soldier. It was then that the Viet Cong unleashed a savage barrage of small arms and
    heavy machine gun fire directed at Sergeant Eaton and Captain Perkin’s chopper and within seconds it crashed
    into a field and ended up on its side, seriously injuring every man aboard.

    In that intense moment of pending tragedy, one man with a broken back would decide the fate of his buddies, as well
    as many of the enraged enemy. Watch The complete story of Sergeant Ed Eaton and the courage and bravery he displayed
    in the face of overwhelming odds. His story is truly one for the ages and was first aired on the History Channel
    last month.

    Please watch the next History channel’s presentation or on Youtube of, “Sniper: Deadliest Missions – Ed Eaton – Army Of One -”
    Thousands of Americans are wondering why he didn’t win the nations highest award. Two high ranking military Officers
    have submitted documentation requesting that Sergeant Ed Eaton be awarded the “Congressional Medal Of Honor.”

  • LJL

    This is someone I am very proud of. He is a cousin of mine. I remember when he came back home from the war – he was very ill. Just saw him tonight at a family gathering and he is doing great.

  • Joshua

    Ed undoubtedly deserves the MOH however, his actions were not taken with this in mind. I am sure he will tell you it does not bother him that he has not received it. There are many soldiers whose bravery has gone unnoticed unfortunately.

    I just hope that his actions are never forgotten and that he is happy in life because that is what is truly important.

  • robertgu

    God Bless You Ed for serving…..as He surely did that night across the pond in Nam…

  • Murray croudis

    I was watching doco on Snipers here in NEW ZEALAND..and Ed Eatons story came up….I would have thought that his actions should easiliy have merited a Medal of honor…(In my country that would be a Victoria Cross)….he is a true buddy..a true mate to his friend..and what more can yah do but have their back……time he got the recognition for has act..

    Thanks mate

  • Alaina Cozby

    I watched that special in the History Channel but was left hanging as to how the two men escaped. I spent the next year doing all I could think to find the answer. I thought for sure Ed would have recieved a medal and more of the story would have been published, to my dismay I shockingly found NOTHING. Thank you so much for sharing this story– not even the History Channel responded to my inquiry. I am apolled that Ed has not recieved the medal of honor. I hope getting this story out gets Ed the recognition he deserves, and like the true hero he is….probably thought he was just doing the right thing- like a true hero.

    Thank you again for this article.

    Alaina

  • MJJ

    I was lucky enough to have Major Mike Perkins as my history teacher after he retired from the military. He told us this story several times. Every time he told us the story he always expressed how grateful he is for Ed. He deserves the Medal of Honor.

  • Michelle Walters Haugle

    WOW is all I’ve got. Oh, and THANK YOU.

    WHERE is his Medal of Honor?

    I had the honor of watching this yesterday on MHC. And to Major Mike, wish I had you as a history teacher <3

  • SFC Retired

    I served with the 9th Infantry Division, 4th/39Inf, Oct ’68 – Jun ’69. Based on what I saw today on the History Channel regarding Sgt. Eaton’s actions, I don’t understand why he wasn’t put in for a valor award. When it was mentioned that Sgt Eaton was in the Mekong Delta, I had a hunch he was part of the 9th Infantry Division. I hope he gets what he deserves for his heroics, even though time has passed. God knows who the real heroes are, even though some may not be recognized. Thank God for men like Sgt Eaton.

  • John Wilch (TSgt, USAF Ret.)

    Guys, I just talked to my Congressman Raul Labador (R, Id) and he said that he believes that he and his office has forwarded the info on Sgt Eatons MOH on. However I’ll check with his office later this week and give them more info. I served in country around that time (1st Cav (AM) as a door gunner.

    WELCOME HOME, BROTHERS AND MAY HE WATCH OVER YOU AND YOURS!

  • mario hernandez

    sgt. eaton, i hope you read every one of these comments and know that everyone that recognizes you and what you did that night and i just wanna say we’ll make sure you get what you deserve no matter what. i just want to say thanks and i wish i could be like you one day. – cadet sgt. hernandez

  • Rebecca Goins

    What does it take for a hero like Ed Eaton to be forgotten? Paperwork! The United States Government took boys, sent them to a foreign country and ask them to be men. Not only did they prove themselves to be men, they proved themselves to be PROUD AMERICAN HEROS! Unselfishly giving for their fellow soldier/brother.
    Vets from all wars are the reason we can stand on our own two feet and NEVER have to kiss the feet of any foreign government.
    Thank God for Ed Eaton and men like him! We will never live long enough to repay them for their heroism.

  • http://twitter.com/dennisglea Dennis F. Gleason

    “I was thought to have been brave and they gave me medals for showing courage. It wasn’t that I was brave or displayed that much courage for not leaving the battlefield. It was because I was so terribly frightened to let one of my friends die alone, that my legs would not carry me off the field of battle. So, I stayed beside him and fought until I was the last man standing.”
    “ Anonymous Civil War Soldier” July, 1863, near Gettysburg
    On April 3rd, 1969, the furthest thing from my mind was going off to war in Vietnam. I had received scholarships for Football and Baseball at the local Community College in Walla Walla, and as baseball season was beginning, I was looking forward to starting as a second baseman for the Warriors. Jim Buchan, a new sports writer at the Union Bulletin, had even mentioned to me, under his breath, that he thought I had a great throwing arm. To me, like most young men in my situation, I had many unrealistic dreams of glory and was fairly sure that a professional scout would soon be knocking on my door offering me a Major League contract and a boat full of money. Forty-two years later, I’m still waiting for that knock.
    On the same day, eight thousand miles away, a good friend of mine from high school was aboard a Huey helicopter heading into danger. On April 3rd, 1969, Sergeant Ed Eaton was a 20-year-old Army sniper. As part of a night raid into the Mekong Delta, he and his buddies were searching for the elusive enemy during the Vietnam War. Unable to find any Viet Cong, Eddie and his fellow troopers headed back to their landing zone and
    began reloading into the waiting helicopters.
    It wouldn’t be long before the night sky would explode into fire and bullets would rain in on the two helicopters as they were attempting to lift off. Luckily, they made it away safely, but once in the air they realized that someone was missing. Inexplicably, in his excitement, one of the soldiers had jumped off the helicopter when the shooting had begun. The Commanding Officer, Capt. Mike Perkins, wasn’t about to leave anyone behind and abruptly ordered the pilot to return for him. While Sgt. Eaton’s chopper provided covering fire, the other helicopter was able to locate
    and rescue the stranded soldier. It was then that the Viet Cong unleashed a savage barrage of small arms and
    heavy machine gun fire directed at Sergeant Eaton and Captain Perkin’s chopper and within seconds it crashed
    into a field and ended up on its side, seriously injuring every man aboard. In that intense moment of pending tragedy, one man with a broken back would decide the fate of his buddies, as well as many of the enraged enemy. Watch The complete story of Sergeant Ed Eaton and the courage and bravery he displayed in the face of overwhelming odds. His story is truly one for the ages and was first aired on the History Channel last month.

    Please watch the next History channel’s presentation or on You tube of, “Sniper: Deadliest Missions – Ed Eaton – Army Of One -”
    Thousands of Americans are wondering why he didn’t win our nation’s highest award, Two high ranking military Officers have submitted documentation requesting that Sergeant Ed Eaton be awarded the “Congressional Medal Of Honor.”

  • http://www.carlangas.com carlangas

    Its funny how in the last sentences when the writer says “…How about the fact that he elected to stay behind to protect the last man injured from the invading horde?” he doesn’t realize that the invading horde its actually the US army on Vietnam itself. Viet Cong soldiers were just fighting off an invading army that was destroying their homeland with bullets, bombs and napalm.
    And, in the end… the US didn’t win, many died and nothing happened…

    • John Wilch (TSgt, USAF Ret.)

      Sir, the US Military were not what you called an invading army we were there on the behast of the rightful government (The Government of South Vietnam). If you want to know who were accually the invaders, try China, Russia, and France.

      So, Sir, before you open your mouth and slandder someone do your research.

      US Combat Veteran: Vietnam – ’68 – ’69: 1st Cavalry Division (AM).

  • David Thornton

    Mr. Eaton ,thank you for your service and gallantry . You are the epitome of the American serviceman . I saw your story on the history channel and was amazed . In my eyes you are a hero . May God bless !

  • John Wilch (TSgt, USAF Ret.)

    We need to get this man his CMH, he deserves it. My God watch over him and his family.

    I’ve been taking to my Congressman, Raul Labrador, and he said he is working with several others to get it down. However, he said we need others to talk with their elected officials.

    US COMBAT VETERAN: Vietnam ’68-’69, Doorgunner, 1st Cav. Div. (AM)

    • Chris LaFreniere (MAJ, USAR)

      John,

      Just saw the show today. I never heard of him before, but I tell you this is someone who should be honored. I am sure hundreds of comrades demonstrated similar acts of valor that were not witnessed or forgotten but we have an obligation to recognize those that we know of. I just sent an email to my Senator in GA and asked him to discuss with the Oregon Senators as well. I hope he follows through.

      OIF/OEF

  • Martin Kubota

    Just saw the sniper program again and decided to find out what award Ed Eaton got
    for his bravery. When I discovered he received no award after all these years, I was SHOCKED!
    Our govt should give him the recognition her deserves. GIVE HIM HIS MEDAL OF HONOR!

  • http://yahoo bob harshfield

    your the man eddy

  • Raymond Naclerio

    An incredible himan being it outrageous that this great warrior has been ignored. After seeing this tears came to my eyes happy that they survived sad that this man deserves the nations hoghesz honor and has been ignored. WHY?

  • Leandro

    I just cant belive he dont have a Medal of Honor. Its a crime.

  • http://yahoo Graham Steele

    Moved to say something after the sniper special on History! Never been a military man,just a free everyday person walking the planet,thanks to unbelieveably brave men like Sgt.Eaton. God bless you……..

  • MAJ USAR

    Sir you are a Medal of Honor winner in our book. Thank you for being not only a warrior, but a humble gentleman; very rare these days in the ME generation.
    God Bless you
    retired OEF, OIF, Grenada, Beirut Lebanon.

  • T. Reiter

    It is simply absurd that Ed Eaton has not been awarded the Medal of Honor. I know that many, many service persons have done things that were above & beyond the call, but if his actions don’t just scream MOH, then I don’t know what does. Not taking anything away from the many worthy & distinguished recipients of the MOH, but many did lesser, but still deserving feats & were awarded the MOH.
    Action definitely needs to be taken while there are still persons that remember the action & can help confirm that award.
    -Mr. Eaton, thank you so very much for your service, your bravery & your modest & humble nature.. There are truly too few person like you.Thanks again.

    U.S. Army, Grenada & Gulf War

  • JIMMY MARSHALL

    SIR I JUST WATCHED THE HISTORY CHANNELS SHOW ON YOU AND HAD TO GET OUT OF BED COME DOWN AND TELL YOU THANK YOU FOR MY FREEDOM. YOU ARE TRULY WHAT THE WORD MEANS !!!! I WAS 8 YEARS OLD WHEN YOU WERE WILLING TO GIVE UP YOUR LIFE TO SEE THAT I COULD CONTINUE TO PLAY BASEBALL AT LYONS PARK . THANK YOU SIR

  • Pingback: Sgt Ed Eaton - Viet Nam Sniper and Hero

  • FallenInFallujah

    Thank you for your brave & heroic service. Thank you for thinking not of yourself, but of your team. Thanks for being a true patriot & a true role model. Selfless behavior. You sir deserve the CMO if anyone does.

  • Bob61

    I watched this today,a bit later than most of you.
    Interesting that Mr Eaton and Mr Perkins believe that Eaton’s “short time” may have been responsible for paperwork disappearing,but Kerry was able to get his processed in record time before he returned to the world.
    I guess it comes down to who you know.
    Or who you’re willing to write fictitious books about.

  • MiamiEddy

    Ed and Mike, thank you for my freedom. Ed’s selfless act and not abandoning his CO is worthy of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Ed Eaton put it all on the line.

    • jamesdorr

      I didn’t realize the Vietnam War was about our freedoms?

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  • Alec

    Ed shops at my local Safeway!

  • R. L. Jiner

    I don’t think we have a medal to cover this. CMH really isn’t enough.

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